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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
is the next question. >> caller: the standards and technology. the agency tasked with buildis fail -- >> host three mike. do you have ollowup question? we undd whe you are going. >> caller: sample -- >> host: we'll see what the senator has to say about that. 9/11 conspiracy theories and different ways of looking at 9/11. what are your thoughts? >> guest: you know, the report that i go by is 9/11 commission frankly, many of the recommendations and assessments have become very relevant this week as we have dealt with a shocking tragedy in tbons. and, you know, actually given me this week an opportunity to reflect on how far we have come, for example, with homeland security in the ten years since that agency was created. as you noted, i'm on the home land security and government affairs committee, and, you know, they are hard at work. the joint terrorism task force through the fbi and homeland security and local officials in boston and trying to bring answers and bring ultimately the perpetrators to bear the full weight of justice in the united states. but, you know, back to the caller's questio
's because of years of federal support to develop hydrofracking technology. the eastern gas shales project was an initiative the federal government began back in 1976 before hydrofracking was a mature industry. the project set up and funded dozens of pilot demonstration projects with universities and private gas companies that tested drilling and fracturing methods. this investment by the federal government was instrumental in the development of the commercial extraction of natural gas from shale. in fact, microseismic imaging, a critical tool used in fracking, was originally developed by sandia national laboratory, a federal energy laboratory. the industry was also supported through tax breaks and subsidies. in fact, mitchell energy vice president dan stewart said in an interview that mitchell energy's first horizontal well was subsidized by the federal government. mr. mitchell said, and i quote -- "d.o.e., that's the department of energy, d.o.e. started it and other people took the ball and ran with it. you cannot diminish d.o.e.'s involvement." so the basis of the natural gas revolution
museum is to inspire them to keep going in technology and engineering careers and fields. so if we can get the kids to start designing at a young age, to start inevacuating at a young age -- inevacuating at a young age, hopefully they'll love it and have a successful career. >> this continues today at san jose's tech museum of innovation. >> we need engineers, scientists and kid going toot fields. -- into those fieldings and. we're going to talk about that with immigration. >> there's not talent. >> the more you want to know what's going on with the world, engineering, and science. >> to tell you the truth, i was deciding, go into physics or not and you know what my counselor told me in high school, he said the education's not going to kill you and it didn't. >> this is true, and you're putting it to use with the forecast. >> talking about a the fact that it's going to get warm in the bay area. mostly sunny skies, haze out there, temperatures are 7 degrees cooler at this hour than they were yelled morning in parts of the bay area. we expect a pretty rapid warm up. 49 degrees at concord
, in eastern colorado we have seen new technologies that can produce american resources, that must and have to be a part of an all-of-the-above, an all-american energy plan. an all-american energy plan that will rely on not somebody thousands of miles away from us, not on somebody overseas, but right in our own backyard. our neighborhoods -- our neighbors. maybe our family members. people in our communities who can produce the energy that we use each and every moment of our lives, to better the lives of our families, to create the next product that will ignite an entire economy. but we can't do that unless we have an affordable energy policy. and that's why an all-american energy plan is so important. and that's why it's an absolute and fundamental key to making life work for so many people across this country. what we can do with natural gas, a clean-burning fuel created right -- developed, extracted right in colorado, what we can do to use the oil, the wind power, the solar power that we are utilizing in colorado to make life work for families. and how does life work? i think we're all fa
. our efforts mandate investments in the people, processes, and technology, not just technology, people, processes, and technology. completed training to improve the quality and productivity of claims. more are being trained, and for the new employees at complete more claims per day in their predecessors. use of visibility benefits and questionnaires. online forms for submitting medical evidence has dropped average processing time as a medical exams and improved accuracy. there are now three lines for processing claims, an express line for those that will predictably take less time, a special operations lane for unusual cases or those requiring special handling, and a core lane with roughly 60 percent of the claims, and that is the remainder. technology is critical, and in the backlog. our paperless processing system, veterans benefits management system will be faster and improve access, live automation, and reduce aryans. thirty regional offices now use this. of 56 will have it by the end of this year. homelessness, the last of our three particles, to end veterans homelessness in 2015.
and can only respond to known threats. cyberthreats evolve at the speefed technology and this measure helps the private sector protect against cyberattacks by providing companies with the latest cyberthreat information from the intelligence community which has timely classified information about destructive malware. this cyberthreat intelligence is the information that companies and the government need to protect and defend their networks. the so-called signatures are primarily made up of numerical codes consisting of zeros and ones without any perm information attached. -- any personal information atammed. cispa is a result of cooperation between the community, companies and to a certain degree the white house as it pertains to many measures included in this legislation. during their efforts to improve the bill, they also maintain a dialogue with privacy advocates in an effort to strengthen civil liberties, protections and oversights. i had a personal note here for the reason that over a period of 10 years i served eight of those years on the intelligence committee. and the now chair
and the military side. i've constantly tried to improve how we address the need for the next generation technology, public-private cooperation and ensuring that we have the price personnel to counter this 21st century cyberthreat. however, i am uncompromising in safeguarding the rights of our citizens and i will never sacrifice our civil liberties for unneeded intrusion. to this end, the amendment i am offering today would strengthen existing provisions in the bill to include the privacy officer and the officer for civil rights and civil liberties of the department of homeland security askey stakeholders in the report that would a-- as key stakeholders in the report. this report would assess how this legislation affected our civil liberties and privacy throughout our federal government, and the department of homeland security is the -- the key civil department in our federal government that develops and implements cybersecurity protocalls for the rest of the -- protocols for the rest of the federal government. it is crucial that they be part of any assessment and work with both the privacy office
kidney and used living cells to rehn regenerate it. researchers hope to use the technology to produce human kidneys. >>> according to a new government report, women at high risk of developing breast cancer could benefit from preventive medicines. we are introduced to one woman who started using the drug tamoxifen to lower her chances of getting the disease. >> reporter: breast cancer runs in nadine's body. after doctors removed an abnormal lump, she went on a drug to reduce breast cancer by 50%. >> i felt like i was a sitting duck. i wasn't really doing anything pro actively about all of the family history of breast cancer. >> reporter: according to new recommendations from the u.s. preventive services task force, women should find out from their doctors if they have a high risk of getting breast cancer. >> for example, age, race, ethnicity, the age at which the woman delivered or had her first live born child, family history. >> reporter: if they are at high risk, they should discuss with their doctor whether drugs like tamoxifen are right for them. both carry serious side effects. >
relapsed. her students sprung into action. >> you are going to use technology however you can. >> they quickly created a facebook page and website and organized donor drives all over the world. southeast asians are one of the smallest groups to donate bone marrow. >> someone from south asia, one in over 20,000 people find a match. >> at this temple people swabbed and joined the donor list. in sunnyvale, abc7 news. >>> we have information on how you can register to be a bone marrow donor at abc7news.com. just look at "see it on tv." >> right here right now ms. lisa argen to talk to you about the accuweather forecast. >> it's pretty nice out there right now. no clouds. maybe a beach day. even if you don't like the beach, it will be pleasant along the shoreline. sea breeze coming back in the afternoon. no worries there. but upper 80s inland east bay. we will talk about the rest of the bay and how long the warmth will last coming up. >> thank you, lisa. also ahead, the warriors, my warriors, battling the nuggets to the end in game one of the playoff series. but a >> welcome back.
that could be bigger than what you already have and we all know that with technology you can get more out of the old fields, but this is brand new stuff. >> well, what we are doing is the wise seismics that we have been doing -- >> what? >> wise athemmic seismic, and we have done it on the shelf, and we have joined with apache on some of the fields and you look for the big discoveries under salt. you think about this, if you want to hide a big oil under it is under salt. >> how deep? >> 15,000 to 20,000 are the primary targets. >> when you talk about, you are not a huge oil company, but this is the kind of thing that i would expect a huge oil company to do, and if we have things like happened with nick moran where, or davie jones to hit some dry holes how could you be put in a damaging position by this kind of thing? >> well, the wells that we are drilling are $30 million or $40 million, and we have 30%, and the one exxon is $30 million and done the first two, and the risk/reward is high and the reason they are there and while they are good sizes for us, 30 to 50 million barrel opportunit
played a big role in the boston bombing story this week. kron four's jeff bush explains how technology helped and hurt the flow of information. >> reporter: the entire country was focused on the events in boston all week long. it was a drama that played out on every possible platform imaginable. on monday, youtube videos were uploaded shortly after the bombing. this was a big asset to detectives who were just beginning their investigation. twitter was essential with getting the word out about the bombing but also helped people reconnect with loved ones after the explosions. internet sleuths were hard at work enhancing video and still images and uploading themagain, playing a key roll in helping police figure out who the bombers were. then, on thursday, when the fbi released the photos of the bombing suspects those images were shared across all platforms of social media. at the same time, police were looking into the youtube and twitter accounts of the bombing suspects to get some insight about possible motivations. the drama intensified on the computer screen early friday morning when
or location. fedex is a huge technology company and they can pull this off. . >> human can draw blacks news segments of comcast 193 or 24 hour news channel. >> jacqueline: down in the south bay, saw the low 80s as well. eighties in san jose and sunnyvale. and conquered it was 84 degrees. closer to the coastline, we did hit 73 earlier today but then the sea breeze wins kickstand and were sitting at 59 degrees now. this afternoon, 65 in oakland. again, things have really cooled off pretty dramatically. as we look ahead, the cool down continues. tomorrow more 70 degree readings and really no '80s. and to thursday, we will see that fog impacting us and cooler. fox tracker is not doing a very good job of showing that fog near the coast line. it's going to be up and down the coastline. at the 8:00 hour, we are still fairly mild tomorrow morning. 50s as you head out to the door. '60s and '70s by noon. and it 2:00 hour, we are large leasing 70 degree readings. in your neighborhood, and the south bay, we have looking at 74 palo alto, 75 santa clara, 74 also in san jose for inland valley, upper 70's.
cameras. ♪ and even stop itself if it has to. the technology may be hard to imagine. but why you would want it... is not. the 2014 e-class. it doesn't just see the future. it is the future. >>> new this morning, runners at the london marathon are remembering victims of the boston bombings. good morning, welcome to mornings on 2. i'm claudine wong. >> and i'm eric rasmussen. runners held a moment of silence this morning for the victims of the boston bombings. many runners wore black ribbons as a tribute throughout the 26- mile race. race organizers are donating $100,000 to one fund boston. that's the relief effort set up by the state of massachusetts. >> very proud the other runners from the united states running here and i think it will be an emotional time for me as well. >> about 40% more police officers than normal patrolled the event. >>> cheered on all the participants. he had no hesitations about coming to the race and called the response to the boston bombings remarkable. >> and happening right now, a church service in boston for the victims of the twin bombings. this is a l
? just wanted to check and make sure that we were on schedule. the first technology of its kind... mom and dad, i have great news. is now providing answers families need. siemens. answers. get younger looking skin fast. with new olay regenerist micro-sculpting cream. with 2 new anti-aging ingredients. visible wrinkle reduction starts day 1. see younger looking skin before you finish one jar. new from olay. >>> already under arrest, timothy mcveigh, who authorities now know to have been the man they originally referred to as john doe number one. the other principle suspect in the bombing. mcveigh moved in handcuffs and leg irons from perry, oklahoma, to a federal prison outside oklahoma city. >> timothy mcveigh under arrest on this day in 1995 for his role in the oklahoma city bombings. he was, of course, ultimately convicted, executed back in 2001. the explosion at the alfred p. murrah federal building killed 168 people and injured more than 500. it was the worst terror attack on u.s. soil until september 11, 2001. >>> up next, those who lost limbs in the boston bombing a view of what
they needed to replace older security equipment and technology, expand restricted we keyway system ems and place security levers on all doors which allowed teachers to lock tours doors from the inside. you may say that's not expensive. why do you need to spend money? it sure adds up when you really want to secure a door and you want to do it right. so if you have many, many doors so we can help them do these things. and if they wanted to, make sure they harden their facility, that's what the money is for. now, there's a township in new jersey, they used funds to secure perimeter and playground areas by installing security gates at elementary and intermediate schools to create a safer learning environment. the new exterior fences define school boundaries making the schools safer for students. entourier gates were replaced, providing the ability to lock off specific areas of the schools during emergencies. again, it's common sense but when these schools were built, madam president, no one thought about this. everything was open. like the capitol, when i came here, i'm dating myself, a lo
shows in terms of sales volume, and we all know how we're using our technology more and more every day for our personal lives and how we defend on it. for example, the national shooting sports foundation surveyed owners of modern sporting rifles in 2010 and found that 10% of them, 10% of all rifles sold had purchased their firearms at gun shows, whereas 25% had purchased them online. 25%. believe me, i understand the political stakes for my colleagues and i sympathize. i have been there. i understand it. and comes from states like west virginia, and no state has a higher regard for the second amendment rights to bear arms than my state. in fact, on the great seal of the state of west virginia, the preamble is montani sember liberai. in latin, that means mountaineers are always free. you know how we feel. one of the review states that became a state during the civil war, broke away from virginia at that time. but west virginians are also guided by a little common sense. i have said this. in west virginia, we know what nonsense is, we know what common sense is, and now we know what gun s
plan calls for more security strategy that combines personnel, the ground, and technology like drones to monitor the border. as far as interior enforcement, there will put in place a mandatory employment garrett overification system, e-verify. and assistant to make sure e- verify is manageable and for employers and fraud-proof, to mae people cannot make up social security numbers or work off stolen social security numbers. st: the gang of eight spoke yesterday on capitol hill. four republicans and four democrats. lindsey graham of south carolina addressed concerns that he has heard from his peers about the pathway to citizenship. [video clip] >> learn the language, as a civics exams, pay a fine, work, pass a criminal background check, half of my family would be excluded. this is no easy task. [laughter] i'm glad we are not applying it to ourselves. i knowe is that america is ready for immigration reform. you look at all the polls. if the congress ready to do something that we should have done a long time ago? i really believe we are. if you think the border can be better secured, we h
records are prime targets for attackers to steal. according to the information technology industry council, 18 adults become victims to cybercrime, including identity campaigns ishing every second. this adds up to 1 1/2 million cybercrime victims each day. cyberattacks present a very real and dangerous threat to the united states, however the government currently
in a competitive market, we win. we have the best workers. we have the best technology. we have freedom. we have the rule of law. we need to do commonsense tax reform for the purposes of putting us in a position where we can create the jobs today and for generations to come because we will then create a fair, level playing field that allows us to start building things in america, allows us to put people to work for generations to come. so i appreciate my good friend from oklahoma bringing this issue to the forefront and having this conversation tonight. and i know he's bringing forth a copy of the code and the regulations and all you have to do is look at that colossal piece of paper or reams of paper, books of paper, 70,000 pages of statutory tax and regulation. we in america can do better. we as house republicans demand us to do better, and we will do better under the leadership that house republicans are doing in the ways and means committee and as a conference to make sure that we end up with a code that is simple, fair and no longer is riddled with loopholes, big government handouts, big go
the door for this, but this is why i answer the way i did that i see that with the technology goings way it is and with drone technology advancing and drones getting smaller and smaller, they are not going to the the giant, big predators flying over pakistan, but little small drones to be armed with things. this is not science fiction here in terms of this is actually happening. >> booktv on location on the campus of the university of southern california at the l.a. times festival of books talking with mark mazzetti, "new york times" national security correspondent and author of this book, "the way of the knife," and, jim, you're the next caller from idaho. hi, jim. >> caller: good afternoon, gentlemen. i have a question. the la proider of servicee of to the war department in afghanistan, and i asked how the afghans were going, and i quoted him in the remark right now saying that it's basically a total failure. he went into details about that aspect of what basic means. what do you think the result is basically in afghanistan? >> well, it's obviously a question on a lot of people's mind.
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)